Review

Closure Documentary Review (Netflix)

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My Rating: 3.7
This is an emotional documentary about a young woman’s search to find her birth parents after growing up in a large multiracial family in Washington State. Angela, an African American woman that was raised by Caucasian parents has always felt a need to connect with her birth parents and find out more about herself. This documentary is a personal and heartfelt story that takes the viewer through the spectrum of emotions felt by adoptive children and their families. It touches upon issues of identity related to race, family and sense of belonging without delving too deep in any of these topics.

This film begins with a pivotal moment when Angela finally strikes up the courage to call her birth mother for the first time. The phone rings and we hear a “hello” from the mother that she so desperately was trying to find. The film then launches into the back story of a young girl adopted as a baby with special needs. She was told that she would never walk. We discover that not only does she walk but she becomes a basketball player. She is a psychology major and works in the adoption agency that her parents adopted her from.

We follow Angela and her family’s journey to find her birth parents. The eventual meeting is complicated and filled with nervousness, joy and, as the title suggests, closure for Angela and her family. Undoubtedly the heart of this film is Angela. Throughout her journey of self-discovery, she remains effervescent and positive. The combination of her vulnerability and simultaneous strength is what really resonated with me. The director of the film is her husband, Bryan Tucker, who serves as a narrator of the story. This adds to the extremely personal nature of the film. If there is one criticism that I could give to this movie is that I would have wanted to hear more of Angela’s story and experiences in her own voice. We saw her go through all these life changing experiences and I wanted desperately to know what was going through her head.

Though the film could have dug deeper into the underlying effects and ramifications that the adoption process has on families and individuals, this film manages to take us on a personal journey that is certainly worth watching and reminds us that coming to terms with your history and roots is an important part of self-acceptance.
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